Tag Archives: knowyourOTCs

Tips for Preventing Summer Bug Bites

Summertime means being out on the lake — with bugs!

When this is your view for the majority of your summer (at least on the weekends), that’s a very good thing. But it also comes with some very bad things — namely, a few million mosquitoes and other flying pests that could turn a smooth ride into a bumpy nightmare.

My kids love to be outside. And ever since I took up fishing and got myself a canoe, I love taking them out on the water. We navigate new rivers, ponds, and lakes and pretend we’re explorers seeing new lands for the first time. We catch our fill of bass and pickerel and we SWEAR the biggest fish of our lives just nibbled on our line but barely escaped our clutches. And we definitely chronicle the wildlife we see.

Beavers firming up their dams and gnawing on trees. River otters darting across the river. And, unfortunately, bugs. So many bugs. Which is why I’ve learned a few helpful tricks to cut back on the damage, and teamed up with KnowYourOTCs.org to dole out a few ways you and your family can mitigate mosquito maladies this summer.

When it comes to a day outside and preventing bug bites, it’s all in how you prepare.

The most obvious way is using insect repellent. I’m now going to shout one word at you and if you take anything from this post, this is the word I want you to remember. Ready? DEET!!!!! Use repellent that has DEET. I beg you. This is BY FAR the most effective repellent you can use, and it protects for between 2-5 hours. Get more useful info here.

But when you’re using it, keep a few things in mind:

  • Don’t spray near kids mouths or noses
  • Spray in an open area
  • Apply the spray 15 minutes before prolonged exposure to the sun
  • Don’t use on kids younger than 2 months
  • Don’t use any sunscreen/DEET combos — it dilutes the effectiveness of the sunscreen

Oh, and don’t apply insect repellent directly to open wounds. I know this one from experience, because I’m frequently an idiot. It burned worse than that time in college when — well, that’s a story best left untold.

It’s also wise to wear long sleeves when you can. I know it’s hot and your kids will complain, but they’re probably going to whine anyway so at least they’ll be safer while being annoying, right? Also, avoid perfume and cologne as they attract more mosquitoes.

If your kids do have bug bites, there is some recourse to save what’s left of your sanity in between shouts of “BUT IT ITCHES!!!!”

First of all, consider some OTC meds and skin protectants, which you can find more about here. Also, your kids are going to scratch. They can’t help themselves, but you can do a few things to assist. Use an emory board to soften your child’s nails so when they scratch, they’re less likely to break the skin. And if that doesn’t work, cover up the bites with a band-aid.

And because I so don’t have all the answers, check out this video of Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, who is a lot smarter than I am with even more tips.

So go outside and play because it’s gorgeous out and soon (at least here in New England) it will be winter for 8 months. But make sure you take precautions and don’t mess around with bug bites while you’re hanging out in the yard or park. Because you shouldn’t be collecting mosquito bites, you should be catching outdoor moments like this.


This is a sponsored post. I am collaborating with the CHPA (Consumer Healthcare Products Association) Educational Foundation and knowyourOTCs.org. I was compensated for this post but as always, my opinions are my own.

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Video: Down and Dirty Sunscreen Tips for Parents of Young Kids

One solution to kid sunburns? Wear a hat!

Look, I could type all these well thought out and funny things to tell you how to put sunscreen on kids. But that takes a long time and no one reads anything anymore. So instead of that, I’m just going to show you two quick and funny videos (one of which stars yours truly and Sam!!) that have some great tips on what to look for in sunscreen and how to actually apply it to kids.

Now go forth and seize summer with no burns!

This one is the one with me and Sam:

And this one stars some other top-notch bloggers with ridiculously cute kids:

This is a sponsored post. I am collaborating with the CHPA (Consumer Health Products Association) Educational Foundation and knowyourOTCs.org. I was compensated for this post but as always, my opinions are my own.

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Springing Into Allergy Season

Look at that face. Cute as hell? Absolutely. But the puffy face, filth, and perpetually runny nose? Welcome to springtime allergy season at the Daddy Files household.

I don’t remember this being a problem when I was a kid. I played outside all the time, delighted in baseball, and rolled around in freshly cut grass. But my kids? They are snot factories and the tap is always running (right down their faces). When the seasons change, my kids are more stuffed up than the teddy bears they use for snot rags and it lasts for MONTHS!

And as it turns out, I’m not alone. Did you know:

  • Allergies are the third most common chronic disease among kids 18 and younger
  • Allergies prompt 17 million doctor visits each year

The hardest part is nighttime when they lie down. As soon as they go horizontal, the coughing begins. And then the hacking. Followed by copious amounts of nose-blowing. We have to put boxes of tissues right next to their pillows so they can have access to them all through the night. Picking them up in the morning is a joy, let me tell you.

Antihistamines seem to help a little bit, but they never cure the sleeping issue. It’s actually gotten so bad we’re actually taking Sam to an ENT next month to see if there’s anything else going on in addition to allergies.

In the meantime, if you’re a parent of a kid with chronic allergies, here are some tips to keep in mind if you’re thinking about giving your children a dose of something, courtesy of KnowYourOTCs.org (who I’m working with on this sponsored post):

  • Some OTC oral allergy medicines are available in different dosage strengths. Read the Drug Facts label carefully for appropriate child dosing information and contact a healthcare provider as directed.
  • Some oral allergy medicines may cause excitability or nervousness, especially in children. If you have any questions, contact your child’s healthcare provider.
  • Never use any allergy medicine to sedate or make a child sleepy.

In the meantime, check out this great infographic and if your kids are anything like mine — good luck! You’re going to need it this allergy season.

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Video: 3 Steps for Safely Disposing of Over-The-Counter Medication

I’m gonna be totally honest with you — I never thought about expiration dates on  over-the-counter medication before. Also, I had a bunch of it in my medicine cabinet.

I’m not alone, either. Check out these stats:

  • 62% of adults have never sought information on how to properly dispose their expired over-the-counter (OTC) medicines
  • 50% of adults say they typically dispose of unwanted or expired OTC meds in the trash but only 8% mix them with undesirable substances before tossing

I hate cats and I loathe the taste of coffee, so kitty litter and coffee grinds have always been undesirable substances to me. But little did I know both would actually come in handy one day. That’s because they’re included in the three simple disposal steps:

  1. Mix medicines (do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unpalatable substance such as kitty litter or used coffee grounds
  2. Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag
  3. Throw the container in your household trash

That’s it. Seriously. But if you want more information, you can check out more great tips here.

And although I generally try to keep my ugly mug off video, I’ve teamed up with some great Know Your OTCs bloggers who all combined to form one awesome video.

This is a sponsored post. I am collaborating with the CHPA (Consumer Health Products Association) Educational Foundation and knowyourOTCs.org. I was compensated for this post but as always, my opinions are my own.

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Kids Are Quick So Keep Your Medicine Out of Reach

Keep your meds high and out of reach!

If you’re a parent I don’t have to tell you how quick kids are.

It’s never when you need them to be fast like getting out of bed, getting dressed, putting their shoes on, or picking things up off the ground. Those times? Slow as molasses. But take your eyes off them for 1.4 seconds at the grocery store or stop holding hands at a traffic light for a millisecond and you’ll see EXACTLY how quick they are as you experience some of the scariest moments of your life.

We all those fears of our kids getting lost in a crowd or escaping from us near the street and toddling out into traffic, but there’s something many parents, myself included, haven’t given much thought to — how quick they can be getting into unsecured medicine cabinets.

Seeing that this week is National Poison Prevention Week (March 19-25), it’s a great time to drop some knowledge about kids getting into medicine that can be severely harmful. Tell me if these two data points shock you as much as they did me:

  • Approximately 60,000 kids go to the ER every year due to accidental medicine ingestion. Think about that number. It means four school buses full of children EVERY DAY go to the ER because they get into medicine they’re not supposed to.
  • According to SafeKids, “half of the 2 million calls to poison control centers in 2011 were for exposures and ingestions among kids 5 and under.” That’s a lot of little hands opening cabinets they shouldn’t be able to access.

While restricting access as much as possible is important, so is the messaging we give our kids about medicine. Namely, we need to have honest and frank conversations with them about what medicine is, and that only parents or a trusted caregiver should administer it to them. And NEVER tell them medicine is candy, no matter how difficult it is to get them to take it.

This is especially important to me right now because we’re moving to a new house, and that means packing. So while we’re generally careful with where our meds are stored (even putting a lock on the closet so the little ones can’t get in), it’s an issue we need to keep in mind now more than ever since everything is being put away and in transit. It’s also not just a problem we need to deal with at home, but also when we travel and when our kids go to other homes (like a visit with grandparents). A lapse could mean a life, so I’m going to ask you to do something.

Lock ’em up (the meds, not the kids)

Please take some time this week to double check that your medicines are stored safely up, away, and out of sight of the kids. I know it sounds like something that could never happen to you, but it can. It can happen to all of us — the best of us — and it’s entirely preventable if we just take a little time to be proactive.

Please check out Up & Away for more information and tips, and keep the Poison Control Centers’ phone number handy at home and lock it into your cell phone:  (800-222-1222).

This is a sponsored post. I am collaborating with the CHPA (Consumer Health Products Association) Educational Foundation and knowyourOTCs.org. I was compensated for this post but as always, my opinions are my own.

 

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